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19 January 2017
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Waiting for culture change or something like it
by Jan Lundberg   
A personal journey/an open book

You are not alone in wondering when the obvious is going to be openly recognized:

When will the affordability of providing for basic human needs be widely compared with the towering waste of militarism and aggression, in the U.S. and beyond? When will caring for our planetary home, which only makes entire sense, be Job Number One? How many more Sandys and Fukishimas are necessary before the screaming global alarm is really heard?

 
New Year's Resolutions For a More Simplified and Peaceful Life
by Jan Lundberg   
To put behind us the "con$umerist relationship" that we have with nature, we can do something new that may be radically traditional. Judge for yourself whether if done widely, it might inspire to move us faster toward a paradigm of actual sustainability. Maybe it's something like this new set of alternative New Year's resolutions. Some of them happen to be gift options too. Let the fun and peaceful rebellion begin, starting with a solstice party.
 
Anger-Fueled Suicides – A Society Without Dreams
by Sharif Abdullah   
Image [Editor's note:
The onslaught from industrialized, militarized society, where the vast majority is in some kind of "free slavery," is even worse than Sharif Abdullah identifies in his latest Currents and Futures column which follows. But he's right on target, pardon the expression.
As for me,
 
Survey: When and How Will Gaia Act?
by Jan Lundberg   
"Perhaps there is no Gaia; perhaps Gaia if she exists has no ability or inclination to act; perhaps Gaia is clearly acting already to end the infestation... but for those of us who grew up feeling that nature was all-resilient and not likely to disappear or turn against us, the unthinkable has become the new norm."

  ImageWhen one looks at a blueish star twinkling beyond some silhouetted living leaves in the sky, the beauty and wonder of the natural world speaks to us: this existence we witness as conscious beings is an amazing accomplishment of life on this lucky outpost of the Universe.

 
Denmark: Small, Happy Prosperous Families -- In Contrast to U.S.
by Marilyn Hempel / Jan Lundberg   
ImageAccording to the OECD 2012 world report on life satisfaction, Danes are the happiest people in the world.

Editor's note: Marilyn Hempel's approach to equating happiness with low population size without out-of-control growth, plus equitable income levels, is simple and convincing. Some parts of the puzzle, such as stronger sense of community and safety in public without heavy policing, become more clear, as positive influences can be seen feeding upon each other. Following Ms. Hempel's article is a complementary report by Jan Lundberg (a Danish and Swedish name).

 
Understanding Energy and Dropping the Ego
by Jan Lundberg   
Energy and the "nature connection"

Image Two major aspects of our lives are habitually kept separated, to our detriment and confusion. First, let's agree we are often socially concerned, sensitively aware and observant beings, but coping with ubiquitous, mechanized, artificial environments driven by "the market."

 
Offshore Oil-Drilling Primer for Concerned People of All Ages [new textbook's chapter]
by Jan Lundberg   
Image
fracking in Pennsylvania
David E. Newton, a science professor and writer who has been extensively published, contacted me as an alternative oil industry analyst to write a new textbook's chapter on offshore oil drilling. The publisher, ABC-CLIO of Santa Barbara, CA, Denver, Colorado and Oxford, England just issued the book, World Energy Crisis. It is ambitious, authoritative and yet contains controversial positions.
 
Culture Change's changes - memo from Jan Lundberg
by Jan Lundberg   
Image
Sailing wine Holland-Denmark
Here's the good word for you on the progression of Culture Change: Our work is zeroing in on an historic contribution to global infrastructure change. I believe you'll have a clear idea on why you should support it, if you don't already. (You can do it by here: donating here)

You recall how we saved healthy land with our campaign for a road building moratorium for over a decade, and educated the public. In the past few years you've noticed our growing emphasis on sail transport.

 
Luddite.com, mired in irony in honor of 200th anniversary of Luddite Rebellion
by Chellis Glendinning   
Image
The Luddite Rebellion
1811-1813 to 2011-2013

Native peoples in earlier centuries were stymied when they tried to talk about the European conquest; their pre-Columbian vocabularies had no words to describe such a battering. And it’s like that again. You and I can only peg together language to describe the invasion overwhelming our bodies, psyches, and cultures by technology. And that assault, taken together with the economic/political institutions that fuel it, is swiftly diminishing life’s future on this Earth.

 
The Beauty of Nature versus The Human Fixation. Grassy Fields or Plastic Turf?
by Jan Lundberg   
Image We have just witnessed the power and fury of nature, with devastating hurricane force. But it is through neglecting the beauty of nature, and perpetrating narrow human interests, that we reap nature's wrath - e.g., Sandy.

We all like to think we appreciate the beauty of nature. But to really know it and appreciate it, we need to keep in perspective a critical understanding of what may be termed the human fixation. This is the modern mindset of constantly putting our human-oriented concerns, desires and schemes first.

 
Sailing wine on the San Francisco Bay
by Clark Beek   
ImageSail Transport Network, by Clark Beek, founder of Wine By Sail
This article appeared on SAIL at SailFeed.com

Editor's note:
Clark currently works in marine electronics and has been an active contributor for SAIL for several years. During a multi-year circumnavigation aboard his 40-foot ketch Condesa Clark survived the Asian tsunami and being run down by a freighter off the coast of South America. Clark cruises his sailboat Condesa in the San Francisco area. - Jan Lundberg

 
Bioplastics: Are They the Solution?
by Sarah (Steve) Mosko, PhD   
ImageBioplastics are simply plastics derived from renewable biomass sources, like plants and microorganisms, whereas conventional plastics are synthesized from non-renewable fossil fuels, either oil or natural gas. It’s a common misconception, however, that a bioplastic necessarily breaks down better in the environment than conventional plastics.

Bioplastics are nevertheless marketed as being better for the environment, so how do they really compare?

The Problems with Petroleum-Based Plastics

 
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